Gilbrown wastes yet another asset

Narrow minded Giants offensive coordinator Kevin Gilbrown had his hand in Kevin Boss’ departure from Big Blue.  Obviously, Boss left because he followed the money.  The Raiders made him an offer he could not refuse.  The four year 16 million dollar contract with 8 million guaranteed was not going to be matched by the Giants.  So Boss bolted to the west coast.  But is that the only reason why he left?  No.  Boss felt underused in the Giants offense.   A taciturn Boss pondered about being a more effective weapon in the Giants offense. “I always felt I had the ability to be a guy that catches 60, 70 balls a season.”  While he was a starter for the Giants from 2008 to 2010,  Boss had 33, 42, and 35 receptions. For whatever reason, Gilbrown does not feature tight ends in his offense.  Is Boss’ case an isolated situation?  NO!

 Three years ago, a flamboyant and outspoken Jeremy Shockey forced his way out of the Giants organization.  The main reason for Shockey’s unhappiness was being relegated to a blocking tight end.  In 2002, his rookie year, Shockey caught 74 passes.  And in 2002, he was being coached by head coach Jim Fassel and  offensive coordinator Sean Payton.  Although he caught 60 passes or more three times under Gilbrown, he never eclipsed more than 74 receptions in his career.  Indeed, Shockey has been hobbled by injuries for his entire career.  But his dissatisfaction with the Gilbride offense is similar to Boss’ frustration.  Boss and Shockey wanted to be more involved in the downfield passing game.  Sadly, Gilbrown has had a difference of opinion. Needless to say, Gilbrown views a tight end as strictly a blocker. With Boss gone, the Giants have blocking tight ends on their roster.  Pascoe, Ballard, Hopkins, and newly acquired Daniel Coates are blocking tight ends.  Despite being listed as a TE, Travis Beckum does not have the size to block NFL defenders.  At this point, the Giants do not have a TE who will keep defensive coordinators up all night. Not like Gilbride uses a tight end.  It is the threat of using a Boss or a Shockey in the red zone or up the seam. Consequently, this forced defensive coordinators to game plan for them.   Clearly, Reese must acquire a tight end who can catch a football as well as block effectively.  Otherwise, it sure looks like the Giants are in a tight spot.

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