Should the NFL amend their social media policy?

Redskins quarterback Donovan McNabb thinks professional athletes should not use twitter at all.

From Profootballtalk.com, here is McNabb in his own words on Twitter use.

“First of all I’m not a fan of Twitter,” McNabb said, via a transcript provided to PFT by ESPN 1000.  “Nothing against their program or what they have, but as an athlete I think you need to get off of Twitter.  All these social networks of you tweeting about you watching a game when you wanna be playing in it but you’re mad you’re not playing in it, so you’re gonna criticize someone that’s playing in it. I don’t believe that that’s the right deal.  That’s not professional by any means and, you know, we’re all in a fraternity, so if you see a guy who’s struggling, this isn’t the time to jump on him or kick him while he’s down, you know, because that same guy will come against you and kinda blast your team out the water.  So I think for an athlete to be Twittering is the wrong move, it’s one that [athletes should] leave to the fans and let them comment on certain things, but athletes need to get off Twitter.”

Current NFL policy on social media use prohibits players, coaches, and other team personnel not to “tweet” or “status” 90 minutes before kickoff until conclusion of all media interviews.  But nothing in the policy addresses inflammatory comments made by players.  In this interview, McNabb takes umbrage with players who take cheap shots.  And I agree with McNabb.  Now should all players be banned or censored from using social media.  No.  However,  since certain players bad manners are only exceeded by their bad manners (ie LeSean McCoy), the NFL should adopt new guidelines on what is acceptable social media behavior.  Recent incendiary comments made by Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy about Osi Umenyiora cement intervention by NFL  to hold players accountable for their untoward social media behavior. 

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